Mastcap Lube?

Discussion in 'Sunfish Talk' started by JDRhodes, Jul 16, 2017 at 5:18 PM.

  1. JDRhodes

    JDRhodes New Member

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    is it possible to lubricate the mast cap to make hoisting the sail easier?

    Thanks in advance

    Jeff
     
  2. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Earlier, I got a "dislike" for suggesting WD-40 or waterproof grease.

    That last foot or so tends to jam the gooseneck, so wiggle it with one hand as you pull on halyard with the other.

    If lifting the spars one-by-one doesn't help, change the halyard to a thinner or braided line.
     
  3. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    Remember the lube will cover the entire halyard as you hoist the spars off the deck eventually getting in your hands etc. Push the gooseneck up as suggested
     
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  4. JDRhodes

    JDRhodes New Member

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    My challenge is "how do you do this while seated"? I was getting stuck with the last foot or so of line when the wind began to affect the sail
     
  5. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    It's like that! :confused:

    It helps to have the bow directly into the wind. :cool:
     
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  6. JDRhodes

    JDRhodes New Member

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    Is there a trick for making sure the wind doesn't change direction too much
     
  7. mixmkr

    mixmkr Active Member

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    Totally ease the mainsheet, but don't lose the end to pull in. That way the sail shouldn't fill before fully hoisted
     
  8. beldar boathead

    beldar boathead Well-Known Member

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    Sail indoors in front of a fan.

    Where on earth are you sitting when hoisting the sail? You should be kneeling by the mast if on the water, or if doing it on land be standing up.
     
  9. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Well, yes, but it's the relationship of the wind-to-boat that matters.

    Hoist the sail until the boat starts to respond to the wind, then rapidly hoist up the rest of the way.

    My technique is just that: grabbing a new purchase on the halyard--then using my weight while lowering myself into the cockpit--feet pressing on the cockpit bulkhead for leverage. A halyard cam-cleat installed 2 feet behind the splashguard makes kneeling unnecessary.

    Then use your third hand to control the tiller! :confused:
     
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  10. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Going through my tackle box, looking for something else, I came across part of the answer!

    Replace the stock deck fairlead with one that is sleeved with a stainless-steel eye. They'll run you about $10. :)
     
  11. Sailflow

    Sailflow Member

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    Totally agree with Beldar. Racers lower and raise sails all the time to make adjustments in strong winds and waves. As Beldar says kneel on the deck, pull the sail up, it might stick toward the end and just lift the lower boom and finish raising. On shore stand and pull, again might have to raise the lower boom towards the end.
    LVM the sail should pivot with the wind and flap so it should not respond unless you have the sheet tight.
     
  12. Light and Variable Winds

    Light and Variable Winds Well-Known Member

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    Salt water can stiffen the halyard, and salt crystals can cause friction: soak and rinse in fresh water. The halyard might work better if it were wet.

    Some new replacement lines can be easily modified to have two different diameters.
    Yes, but I raise the sail several yards off the shore. It's my body that gets in the way! :confused:
     
  13. JDRhodes

    JDRhodes New Member

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    I think I figured it out when I tried to follow one of the online rigging videos. My halyard is so thick that it can't loop thru the pullu twice. Upon discovering this I noticed that the end cap slot is narrower than the halyard. Since the boat came this way I didn't think anything about it.
     
  14. Webfoot1

    Webfoot1 Active Member

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    Look for Dry Lube Teflon Spray. On of the listed uses is for
    cables. Only about 14 inchs of halyard would need to be
    coated, the area when the boom starts to lift of the deck.
    Will it work? I don't know but cheap enough to give it
    a try. It could also be applied to the mast where the goose-neck
    rubs or better yet wrap the mast in Teflon Tape.
     

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